Phillip Hayes Reveals How the Rules of Evidence Affect Trial Outcomes

Practicing Defense Attorney Phillip Hayes Discusses Rules of Evidence and Why It Matters

DALLAS, TEXAS, UNITED STATES, December 7, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Evidence may sound like a straightforward matter, but the reality is much more complex. What is introduced, how it’s introduced, and when it’s introduced can all influence the outcome of a case. Practicing defense attorney Phillip Hayes weighs in on how it works.

The rules of evidence refer to legal principles that dictate what kind of proof is admissible in court and how that proof must be shared in a legal proceeding. Trial outcomes can boil down to these laws, particularly when a judge or jury struggles to make the right decision. Phillip Hayes, a successful defense attorney, talks more about how these rules work in real-life and what they can mean to his clients.

The Rules of Evidence May Vary

Any given case can contain countless pieces of evidence that either work in favor of or side against the defense. What is allowed and what isn’t comes down to practical factors, such as how long a case can be tried, and personal opinion, such as what decision-makers feel is fair to those involved.

Phillip Hayes says that’s why the rules of evidence can change from state to state and even from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It also depends on what type of court you’re in. Unsurprisingly, evidence at a custody trial will be treated very differently from that at a murder trial.

The Authenticity and Relevance of Evidence

Evidence comes down to how reliable it is and how it relates to the case. This can become extremely complicated quickly, as different people might argue different points about the same piece of evidence. For instance, if an acquaintance of the accused comes forward and says that the accused told them that they committed the crime, the prosecution might say that the acquaintance is a reliable source and should be allowed to testify at trial.

The defense might argue that the acquaintance has long held a grudge against the accused for a minor transgression and should therefore not be allowed to testify. This type of evidence, also known as hearsay, is typically not allowed in courtrooms — but Phillip Hayes says that there are exceptions to every rule.

Phillip Hayes on Handling Evidence

As a criminal defense attorney, Phillip Hayes has to be aware of how different pieces of evidence should be presented and how they’re likely to be seen by a judge or jury. He also determines what order will make the most sense for the structure of his defense. His goal is to sort out everything before he ever enters the courthouse or consults with another legal professional. Once he has a handle on what’s involved and what’s at stake, he can use the rules of evidence to his client’s advantage.

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 786-551-9491
email us here

Practicing Defense Attorney Phillip Hayes Discusses Rules of Evidence and Why It Matters
DALLAS, TEXAS, UNITED STATES, December 7, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Evidence may sound like a straightforward matter, but the reality is much more complex. What is introduced, how it’s introduced, and when it’s introduced can all influence the outcome of a case. Practicing defense attorney Phillip Hayes weighs in on how it works.

The rules of evidence refer to legal principles that dictate what kind of proof is admissible in court and how that proof must be shared in a legal proceeding. Trial outcomes can boil down to these laws, particularly when a judge or jury struggles to make the right decision. Phillip Hayes, a successful defense attorney, talks more about how these rules work in real-life and what they can mean to his clients.

The Rules of Evidence May Vary

Any given case can contain countless pieces of evidence that either work in favor of or side against the defense. What is allowed and what isn’t comes down to practical factors, such as how long a case can be tried, and personal opinion, such as what decision-makers feel is fair to those involved.

Phillip Hayes says that’s why the rules of evidence can change from state to state and even from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It also depends on what type of court you’re in. Unsurprisingly, evidence at a custody trial will be treated very differently from that at a murder trial.

The Authenticity and Relevance of Evidence

Evidence comes down to how reliable it is and how it relates to the case. This can become extremely complicated quickly, as different people might argue different points about the same piece of evidence. For instance, if an acquaintance of the accused comes forward and says that the accused told them that they committed the crime, the prosecution might say that the acquaintance is a reliable source and should be allowed to testify at trial.

The defense might argue that the acquaintance has long held a grudge against the accused for a minor transgression and should therefore not be allowed to testify. This type of evidence, also known as hearsay, is typically not allowed in courtrooms — but Phillip Hayes says that there are exceptions to every rule.

Phillip Hayes on Handling Evidence

As a criminal defense attorney, Phillip Hayes has to be aware of how different pieces of evidence should be presented and how they’re likely to be seen by a judge or jury. He also determines what order will make the most sense for the structure of his defense. His goal is to sort out everything before he ever enters the courthouse or consults with another legal professional. Once he has a handle on what’s involved and what’s at stake, he can use the rules of evidence to his client’s advantage.Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 786-551-9491
email us here

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